Friday, September 16, 2011

Pupusa Obama?

Pupusas are a gastronomic experience which every visitor in El Salvador should embrace. My first pupusas were served up at Pupusaria Paty: bean and cheese. Since then I have eaten pupusas in homes, in churches, at sidewalk cafes and in large restaurants from one corner of El Salvador to the other, for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks. It's a good thing that I like pupusas.

On the outskirts of Nejapa at the turn of the road which leads to Apopa, with its bright green facade sits the Pupus -->ódromo. This is one of my new favorite places for pupusas, and it has as much to do with the atmosphere and the pupusa-makers as the pupusas themselves. We arrived and settled in front of the first pupusaria in the line of pupusarias which make up the pupusodromo. We scooted benches and tables to create a suitably large dining area. We were presented with a little pad of paper and a pen so we could write down our order: all different kinds and more than 45 pupusas in all. Of course, I ordered pupusas con laroco y queso and and it definitely became a group favorite.

This morning we encountered a laroco plant - a squash-like vine that was growing up on a trellis, producing shade and little white flowers. There, in the garden outside of Mo
This morning we encountered a laroco plant - a squash-like vine that was growing up on a trellis, producing shade and little white flowers. There, in the garden outside of Mo -->
nseñor Romero's house at Divina Providencia, a Carmelite nun presented us with one of the blossoms. We took turns holding it to our noses and breathing deeply while recalling the tasty and cheesy goodness of the pupusas of the night before.

This afternoon, as we sat in a large circle a question was placed before Bishop Gomez: "What is your favorite kind of pupusa?" The Bishop side-stepped the answer for a while, and told a couple of pupusa stories. The pupusa is an indigenous food; the best ones puff up as they are cooked; one place has a pupusa loca (which I believe has a little bit of everything in it).

The question was asked again. This time the response involved President Obama. Did we remember when President Obama visited El Salvador? Weeks before he came, the Bishop said, "resourceful vendors prepared a special pupusa and began calling it the Pupusa Obama." Why was it called the Pupusa Obama? It was made with black corn.

We laughed in disbelief, but the Bishop assured us that this was true. We laughed some more and asked the Bishop again...did he have a favorite kind of pupusa? The answer finally came: pupusa con laroco y queso. Of course!This afternoon, as we sat in a large circle a question was placed before Bishop Gomez: "What is your favorite kind of pupusa?" The Bishop side-stepped the answer for a while, and told a couple of pupusa stories. The pupusa is an indigenous food; the best ones puff up as they are cooked; one place has a pupusa loca (which I believe has a little bit of everything in it).
The question was asked again. This time the response involved President Obama. Did we remember when President Obama visited El Salvador? Weeks before he came, the Bishop said, "resourceful vendors prepared a special pupusa and began calling it the Pupusa Obama." Why was it called the Pupusa Obama? It was made with black corn.
We laughed in disbelief, but the Bishop assured us that this was true. We laughed some more and asked the Bishop again...did he have a favorite kind of pupusa? The answer finally came: pupusa con laroco y queso. Of course!

2 comments:

  1. That was funny. Pupusa Obama!

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  2. Since this post, we went to Pupusaria Roxy in Usulutan and ate several pupusas locas! They were eaten with great gusto and rave reviews. Secret ingredient at Pupusa Roxy: jalapenos! I also recommend the quesilla especial!

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